A Brief History of Nissan

In 1914 the beginning of the Nissan Company began. Four men put their ideas and resources together to create the Nissan Company. They were Yoshisuke Aikawa, Rokuro Aoyama, Kenjiro Den, and Meitaro Takeuchi. There was a limited market so the company struggled in the early years of its conception. Then in the 1920s they produced military vehicles under the name DAT Motors. In 1933 DAT Motors merged with Jitsuyo Motors and became Nissan. Nissan is the Japanese abbreviation of the merged Companies. In 1934 the Company’s name was changed to Nissan to conform to the rest of the world.

The initial product of Nissan was a small Datsun. In the 1930s and 1940s the main production of the Nissan Company shifted to military vehicles for the war. Nissan produced military trucks, torpedo boats, and engines for fighter planes.

The Nissan Company had rapid modernization in the 1960s. The Nissan Company became a major United States player in the automotive industry in the 1970s. In the 1980s the Nissan Company began to manufacture its vehicles in the United States. The Nissan Company launched a luxury brand of vehicles in the 1990s. In 1999 the Nissan Company signed a major deal with the French auto company Renault. Today it is a major global auto manufacturer with cutting edge one hundred percent electric automobiles. The Nissan Company is a solid player in the international market with a close relationship to its European ally, Renault.

Today you can visit any Nissan dealership, such as our local store in Madison WI, Kayser Nissan, and you will see just how far the automaker has come. Look at the wide variety of cars the Nissan Company produces. The Nissan Company Cars include the 370Z Coupe, 370Z Roadster, Altama Coupe, Altama Sedan, GT-R, Leaf, Maxima, Murano, Sentra, Murano CrossCabriolet, Pathfinder, Versa Sedan, Armada, Cube, Juke, NV Passenger Van, and Quest.

Author: Dicky Phillips

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