Electric Vehicle Concerns for Winter

[ad#Top of Post Left]The big push for electric vehicles or EV, has been targeted at large population centers.  Specifically in the US, where pollution, traffic, and even safety can be bettered if more people drove short distance electric vehicles.  However, as EV owners are finding out, there are more bumps in the road when driving an all electric commuter.

Most notably is the recent outcry by individuals who find that their electric vehicles distance capabilities are greatly decreased during the winter months.  Heating the cabin of a vehicle requires a lot of extra energy from the battery, energy that would normally be used to spin the tires to advertised lengths.  However, large population centers like New York and Chicago get quite cold during the winter, lowering the usability of green technology.

Some work has been put into redesigning EV cabins, to supposedly make them super insulated.  There are designs being tested right now that claim to be able to heat a cars cabin using only the passengers body heat.  Unfortunately, this isn’t being put to use right now and those frigid winters in the Windy City are mighty freightening in a tiny little electric car.

Consideration is also being given to electric vehicles that remain on a power grid, which would allow them to be preheated before the driver even gets in the car.  However, some doubts have been raised over any savings that would normally be made by driving an all electric vehicle during the colder months of the year.  Turns out that the  inefficient internal combustion motor is great at giving off heat and providing a toasty drive to work in January.

Author: Christopher

I've been an auto enthusiast since birth. I'm a grease monkey at heart and love learning to work on anything automotive. You'll often find me hiding in the garage, attending car shows, and reading about the latest and greatest online.

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