EV Stations In Houston

[ad#Top of Post Left]EV or electric vehicles are considered the future by many automotive industry experts.  This green technology has its limitations, one of which is it’s source of power, where it fills up or plugs in.  Up until now, the most common place to recharge your EV’s batteries would be at home.  The range limitation of an all electric vehicle limits the purchase opportunity to many long range commuters, so Houston is taking a step to provide other charging station solutions.

“I recognize that Houston is a car city,” she said. “But let’s make sure if you have a particular type of car you want to drive, and it’s an electric vehicle, let’s make sure it’s supported.”

Businesses are already jumping in and offering to support the cities initiative.  In addition to opening up carpool lanes, the city is working with businesses like Walgreens, Best Buy, and other markets to install these EV charging stations.  It’s named the NRG Network and already has plans to install these charge spots in 150 stations.

eVgo Charge Station

eVgo Charge Station

Other problems plague the EV chargers, such as the time it takes to fully charge the usual lithium-ion batteries.  Most of the stations Houston plans on installing will take up to 4 hours to fully charge your vehicle.  This doesn’t exactly lend itself to a quick run into Walgreens for some milk.  Only 50 of the 150 NRG network stations in Houston will be the quick-charge type, which will typically fully charge an EV battery in about 30 minutes.  This becomes a much more manageable time, which could be completed by the time you wait in line at a market and do your weekly shopping.

Taking further steps to support electric vehicles, the NRG Network in Houston has agreed to install the quick-charge stations in residences.  The cost seems relatively inexpensive, a 3 year $49 month agreement is all that is needed.

The new EV stations in Houston, branded as eVgo, are believed to be on the crest of a technological wave.  This wave carries the futures of efficient vehicles, losing our dependency on foreign oil, and many more environmental factors.  Lets hope that the Houston experiment catches on and other cities catch the wave soon.  If we get enough early adopters we can finally drive the price of an EV down and start seeing some real savings that will bring more people on board.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *